Logperch


logperch.jpg

 

Common Name
Logperch
Category
Fish
ScientificName
Percina caprodes
Kingdom
Animalia
Phylum
Chordata
Class
Osteichthyes
Order
Perciformes
Family
Percidae
Genus
Percina
Species
caprodes
SubSpecies
 

 

Description
Cone-shaped snout overhanging mouth; 15 – 20 narrow, vertical brownish saddles (bars of color) continuous across back, alternating in length; pale yellowish-olive background; creamy-white belly; lateral line complete; small black spot at base of tail fin
Size
5 – 8 in. (12.7 – 20.32 cm) long
Ecological Role
This carnivore uses its snout to flip over rocks in order to eat invertebrates found under or on bottoms of rocks. The logperch is active at dawn and dusk. It is a host for the snuffbox mussel, giving nourishment and transportation to the immature form.
Fun Facts
The logperch, also known as a darter or a jack, is one of the largest darters in Kentucky and is sometimes caught on a lure. The logperch is a biological indicator of stream health, as it prefers clean water. Percina means “small perch”; caprodes in Greek means “pig-like,” probably referring to its snout.
Food
Small invertebrates (animals without a backbone) on bottoms of rocks, immature stages of aquatic insects, such as midge larvae, small crustaceans, and snails
Cover
 
Nest
 
Breeding
 
Eggs
 
Habitat
Most common in riffles and runs (areas of strong flow) over gravel or sand in medium sized rivers, often holding under rocks and stones; streams with large, permanent pools and riffles containing gravel, shallow sandy waters of lakes; can also be found in reservoirs; usually on bottom since darters, such as the logperch, have a much reduced or missing air bladder
Kentucky Distribution
Statewide, except for the Tradewater River system
Life Cycle
 
Life Span
3 years
Life Stage
 
Reproduction
 
Seasonal Changes
 
Spawning
Spawning migrations occur; males gather in loose clusters of a few to more than 100 on clean, gravelly or sandy riffles; females enter cluster only when ready to spawn; both vibrate rapidly until buried in bottom; 10 – 20 eggs laid per spawning, but may repeat spawning act several times; exposed eggs often eaten by other males
Status
Common
Uses
 
Voice
 
Young
 
What We Can Do
 
Host
 
Diagnosis and Control
 
Interesting Facts
 
Contributed By
 
Website
http://cnre.vt.edu/efish/families/logperch.html